Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Door moths

A couple of moths from recent weeks, both found on doors, but they are both causing me problems with the ID. Any help would be appreciated.


 Moth 1. Seen 4.11.17 - Ogden Water


Moth 2. Seen 11.11.17 - Copley

10 comments:

Colin D said...

70.095 BF1760 Red-green Carpet Chloroclysta siterata

AndyC said...

The top one looks very interesting what date was it and did you get any other pics.? It could be just a Brick ,, but lets check it out.??

AndyC said...

OMG.its a BRINDLED OCRE.............................

Chris said...

Thanks both for the IDs,

Colin - I looked at red green carpet, but the moth had its abdomen raised so I was going along the lines of Phoenix, but it did not seem right.

Andy - the fact that you put Brindled Ocre in capitals tells me it might be something a bit special - Tell me more!!. Seen at 8.30am on Sat 4th December. The light over the door to the classroom at Ogden comes on at dusk and stays on over night. Each time I go there is usually a selection of moths or some nice spiders around it. I only got one photo,

AndyC said...

This once common resident was found in 1883 around the new gass lamps in the Halifax town centre and 100 + at gas lamps in Halifax in 1897.Was said to still occour up until the early 1960’s but no records since this date.Collinsonn wrote..-
The Yorkshire list states that nowadays this species is rarely recorded except on the East coast. Fortunately it does still occur in our Parish, though rarely. I have recorded three in recent years. It was once a feature of the Halifax Parish and collectors came from far afield to obtain it. There is a rather amusing story told in this respect. The Brindled Ochre emerges from the pupa in autumn. After some flight it seeks out a suitable place for hibernation until the Sallows are in bloom the following spring, at which time it reappears to carry on the species. A very suitable place for hibernation, and perhaps a reason why it so favoured our area, was between the stones of our drystone walls. A party of Lancastrian naturalists, apparently aware of this fact, crossed the border and were busily engaged taking down a wall in search of hibernating Brindled Ochres when the irate farmer appeared. He was unmoved by their pleas of scientific research and in due course they received fines from the local magistrate. The case caused quite a stir in more than naturalist circles and at least one national newspaper carried the headlines "The Case of the Butterfly Hunters." Unfortunately since those days the species has greatly declined. It is probable that this is one of the few species which we can definitely say has been reduced in numbers by the coming of modern street lighting.
Our old records read as follows:-
1883 Abundant round the new gas lamps. 1897 Over 100 at the gas lamps in Halifax.
These entries tell a sad story. It was interesting in 1946, whilst Sallowing (searching the flowering sallows for Spring specimens) with Stanley Sunderland, to have one of these moths actually settle on me. It proved to be a female and laid some eggs. The resulting larvae became the subject of one of a series of articles.
No recent records until the 4th April 2014 when an adult female was attracted to light at Hardcastle Craggs (AC, BL, MH ). It was released later in a large area of hogweed.

Colin D said...

Yes Brindled Ochre I mused over this for sometime as it did not sit quite right - its distribution can be seen here http://www.yorkshiremoths.info/portal/p/Summary/s/Dasypolia+templi . The larva /foodplant feed internally on the roots of hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), and possibly other umbelliferous plants. Its an unexpected find

Its interesting that Ansy mentions Street lightinng as the trend now is to replace the Sodium Lamps with the neon wwhite lighting . I wonder if this change will imapact or reflect ( no pun intended ) on moth populations or breeding cycles

David Sutcliffe said...

Sounds like a great find Chris. Fantastic bit of history there as well. Let’s hope we find a few more in the not too distant future.

Steve Blacksmith said...

Well found Chris!
We have Collinson's collection cabinet at the HSS but it is currently unavailable till we decide how to keep it, so we can't check it for Brindled Ochre. There is probably no room for it at the New Central Library, though this event might be in its favour to be properly available.

Incidentally, our long-standing Recorder of Lepidoptera, Brian Cain, stepped down at the AGM on 14th November. As he gave his final report he stressed the next Recorder/recorders should be able to use computers, something he never did. Many thanks go out to Brian for all his years of interest and recording.

At the HSS there can be more than one Recorder for any order, hopefully working as a team, with one nominate Recorder to communicate with members and the public.

AndyC said...

Steve ...If Brian wants all is records putting onto the Yorkshire data base, I would gladly put them on...

AndyC said...

His