Monday, 1 March 2010

395 glyphipterix haworthana

Charlie,theres still plenty ,found 18 or so in a small area of Langfield Common,they are quite bedraggled,try and get the largest ones if you have a try.Paul,is Blackstone Edge in Calderdale or Greater Manchester ?

8 comments:

charlie streets said...

Might give it a go today Bri if my fitness levels allow - there's too many bloody hills round my way. Blackstone Edge is in Lancashire BTW.

Paul Talbot..aka Moffman said...

Hi Bri
Ian Kimber and I worked both sides of the border on the top of Blackstone Edge to give us records for both Yorkshire and Lancashire. To be honest I was never really bothered where I found a new moth, its was the new to me bit that I enjoyed.

Charlie shame on you, Blackstone Edge is the South Pennines not Yorks or Lancs :-)). Ian Kimber, Martin Tordoff and myself were the South Pennine Posse when out moffing so only got out the GPS if we found a new VC record.

charlie streets said...

Had a wander round Norland this morning with no success. I found a few white feathers in amongst the grasses which was as close as I got. Also found what I thought was a Northern Eggar cocoon in the lower branches of a Bilberry bush but that turned out to be a dog turd :-(

I'll leave it til next year.

Paul Talbot..aka Moffman said...

I will be fascinated to hear your account of rearing through the dog turd Charlie, will it over winter sucessfully do you think ;-))

charlie streets said...

Knowing my luck at the moment a load of parasitic grubs will jump out and I'll never get to see the adult turd in all it's glory!! Either way I won't be photographing the goings on indoors.

Talking of which, my (real) Northern Eggar larva has just begun to feed on some bramble leaves after a couple of days inside and after the recommended spraying with water so things are looking hopeful.

Paul Talbot..aka Moffman said...

Hi Charlie
I found Northern Egger to feed up and grow better on Ivy. The old tough leaves are prefered to new soft leaves in my experience. It might be easier to find Ivy than bramble at the moment.

If you fancy looking for more cocoons of Emperor and N Egger try walking the paths on Norland which are worn deeper into the ground so that you do not have far to bend to look in the heather bottoms which is where I found most of the cocoons. Sorry if you already know all this mate butr just in case I thought I would post it.

PS less dog turds in these areas also :-))

charlie streets said...

Thanks for that Paul I'll give Ivy a go as I've a fair bit in the garden. I've noticed that the bramble leaves soon dehydrate and have to be replaced daily - maybe I can get away with changing the Ivy leaves every two days perhaps.

I hope to do quite a bit of field work up Norland this year especially the Bilberry picking slopes opposite the golf course (not so many dog walkers there!).I had a couple of forays up there last August and there seemed loads more about than on the heather moorland on the tops.Plenty of Cowberry there as well which might contain something nice.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FLWFl1QY1tU/S3j7saR6bXI/AAAAAAAACCE/gQXDFZXsakM/s1600-h/Norland+Bilberry+fields.jpg

Paul Talbot..aka Moffman said...

Hi Charlie
Lack of sheep is the entire differance to me why road verges and Norland are better than the over grazed sheep ridden moorlands around Calderdale.

I find the lanes of upper Calderdale wonderful with lots of lepidoptera and insect. Best places left to find our upland lepidoptera are the minor roads and lanes near Blackstone edge, Todmorden, etc. Here on the Peninsula the lanes of which there are hundreds of miles are superb for all insects and make Calderdale look like a sterile room in comparison, which is one reason I will never move back to Calderdale.